French, Grade 9, Academic (FSF1D) CONTACT US
Course Title : French, Grade 9, Academic (FSF1D)
Course Name : French
Course Code : FSF1D
Grade : 9
Course Type : Academic
Credit Value : 1.0
Prerequisite : None
Curriculum Policy Document: French as a Second Language, The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 and 12, 2014 (Revised)
Course Developer: USCA Academy
Department: French
Development Date: June 2019
Most Recent Revision Date: June 2019

Course Description

This course provides opportunities for students to communicate and interact in French with increasing independence, with a focus on familiar topics related to their daily lives. Students will develop their skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing by using language learning strategies introduced in the elementary Core French program, and will apply creative and critical thinking skills in various ways. They will also enhance their understanding and appreciation of diverse French-speaking communities, and will develop skills necessary for lifelong language learning.

 

Overall Curriculum Expectations

A1. Listening to Understand:

determine meaning in a variety of authentic and adapted oral French texts, using a range of listening strategies;

A2. Listening to Interact:

interpret messages accurately while interacting in French for a variety of purposes and with diverse audiences;

A3. Intercultural Understanding:

demonstrate an understanding of information in oral French texts about aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of French sociolinguistic conventions used in a variety of situations and communities.

B1. Speaking to Communicate:

communicate information and ideas orally in French, using a variety of speaking strategies, appropriate language structures, and language appropriate to the purpose and audience;

B2. Speaking to Interact:

participate in spoken interactions in French for a variety of purposes and with diverse audiences;

B3. Intercultural Understanding:

in their spoken communications, demonstrate an awareness of aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of the appropriate use of French sociolinguistic conventions in a variety of situations.

C1. Reading Comprehension:

determine meaning in a variety of authentic and adapted French texts, using a range of reading comprehension strategies;

C2. Purpose, Form, and Style:

identify the purpose(s), characteristics, and aspects of style of a variety of authentic and adapted text forms in French, including fictional, informational, graphic, and media forms;

C3. Intercultural Understanding:

demonstrate an understanding of information in French texts about aspects of culture in diverse French-speaking communities and other communities around the world, and of French sociolinguistic conventions used in a variety of situations and communities.

Outline of Course Content

Unit Titles and Descriptions Time and Sequence
Unit 1 Les contes de fées

An introductory unit, students will read, watch and listen to several fairy tales. They will participate in discussions and debates with one another and reflect upon the stories studied.

20 hours
Unit 2 C'est Moi!

In this unit, students will share information about themselves, as well as a friend. Using qualifying adjectives, they will write descriptive paragraphs. Reflexive verbs are studied, and the students will create a Facebook page for a celebrity.

22 hours
Unit 3 Les films

Students will learn about and discuss different movie genres. Students will delve into the horror genre, and create a dialogue between two characters. The passé composé of regular and irregular verbs, personal, direct and indirect object pronouns, as well as the pronouns y and en are studied, in order for students to create a proper email message.

22 hours
Unit 4 La saga du monde vers

After learning the futur simple, students will participate in an online graphic novel study. They will engage in discussions about the story and its characters, and they will maintain a comprehension and reflection journal.

22 hours
Unit 5 Vive le Français!

Students will be exposed to a variety of Francophone cultures around the world, with a particular emphasis on music, celebrations, and travel considerations. They will research and plan a trip to their chosen location, and create a comprehensive oral presentation on their chosen culture.

22 hours
Total 110 hours

Assessment Plan
FSF1D

POC O/F/A
P = Product O = Assessment OF Learning
O = Observation F = Assessment FOR Learning
C = Conversation A = Assessment AS Learning

Unit number

Assessment

O/F/A

Expectations

POC

K 25%

T 25%

C 25%

A 25%

Term Work 70%

1.

Discussion Assignment

O/F

A1.1, A1.2, A2.1, B1.1, B2.2

P/C

25

25

25

25

Unit 1 Test

O

D1.1, D1.2, D1.3

P

25

25

25

25

Total

50

50

50

50

2.

Descriptive Paragraphs

O

B1.2, B1.3, D1.3, D2.1

P/C

25

25

25

25

Unit 2 Test

O

D1.1, D2.1

P

25

25

25

25

Total

50

50

50

50

3.

Dialogue Assignment

O

D1.1, D1.2, D2.1

P

25

25

25

25

Unit 3 Test

O

D1.1,. D2.1

P

25

25

25

25

Total

50

50

50

50

4.

Journal

O/F/A

C1.1, C1.2, D1.2, D2.1

P

25

25

25

25

Unit 4 Test

O

D1.1, D1.2, D1.3, D2.1

P

25

25

25

25

50

50

50

50

5.

Trip Presentation

O

B1.2, B1.3, B3.1, B3.2

P

25

25

25

25

Final Exam (30%)

Observation/Conversation

O

O

All strands

P

P/O/C

25

5

25

5

25

5

25

5

Total

55

55

55

55

Total Marks (Assessment of Learning only)

255

255

255

255

Category Weighting

25%

25%

25%

25%

 

Students will be involved in a variety of reading, writing, listening and speaking activities. The development of oral communication skills provides the foundation for students to read and write effectively. Students will have opportunities both to listen and to speak French. These include:

Socratic Dialogue

Practice and Drill

Oral Presentation

Response Journals

Discovery Activity

Presentations/videos

Homework

Demonstrations

Assessment FOR Learning Assessment AS Learning Assessment OF Learning

During this process the teacher seeks information from the students in order to decide where the learners are and where they need to go.

During this process the teacher fosters the capacity of the students and establishes individual goals for success with each one of them.

During this process the teacher reports student’s results in accordance to established criteria to inform how well students are learning.

Conversation Conversation Conversation

Classroom discussion Self-evaluation Peer assessment

Classroom discussion Small group discussion Post-lab conferences Presentations of research Debates
Observation Observation Observation
Drama workshops (taking direction) Steps in problem solving Group discussions Presentations Group Presentations
Student Products Student Products Student Products
Reflection journals (to be kept throughout the duration of the course)
Check Lists
Success Criteria
Practice sheets
Socrative quizzes
Projects
Poster presentations Tests
In Class Presentations

Some of the approaches to teaching/learning include

 

Strategy

Who

Assessment Tool

Assignments

teacher

rubric or marking scheme

Oral Presentations

self/peer or teacher

rubric

Work & Task Sheets

self /peer or teacher

checklist or rubric or marking scheme

Textbook Use

self or teacher

checklist

Teacher Led Review

self/peer or teacher

checklist

Performance Task

self/peer or teacher

rubric

Written Quiz

teacher

marking scheme

Written Test

teacher

marking scheme

Performance Task

teacher

rubric or marking scheme

Final Written Exam

teacher

marking scheme

The evaluation of this course is based on the four Ministry of Education achievement categories of knowledge and understanding (25%), thinking/inquiry (25%), communication (25%), and application (25%). The evaluation for this course is based on the student's achievement of curriculum expectations and the demonstrated skills required for effective learning.

The percentage grade represents the quality of the student's overall achievement of the expectations for the course and reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline.

A credit is granted and recorded for this course if the student's grade is 50% or higher. The final grade for this course will be determined as follows:

  • 70% of the grade will be based upon evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade will reflect the student's most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration will be given to more recent evidence of
  • 30% of the grade will be based on a final exam administered at the end of the The exam will contain a summary of information from the course and will consist of well-formulated multiple-choice questions. These will be evaluated using a checklist.

Textbook and Resources

  • Sans frontières 9e, Catenacci et al., Pearson Education Canada, 2000
  • https://groupemediatfo.org/
  • Je suis capable! (French) Paperback – Apr 1 2013 by Dominique Pelletier
  • com

Teachers who are planning a program in Core French must take into account a number of considerations in a number of important areas. Essential information that pertains to all disciplines is provided in Program Planning and Assessment. The areas of concern to all teachers include the following:

  • types of secondary school courses
  • education for exceptional students
  • environmental Education
  • program consideration for English Language Learners
  • career education
  • cooperative education and other workplace experiences
  • health and safety
  • Ethics
  • Equity and inclusive education
  • Financial Literacy
  • Critical thinking and critical literacy

Considerations relating to the areas listed above that have particular relevance for program planning in French are noted here.

It is important to ensure that all students, especially those with special education needs, are provided with the learning opportunities and supports they require to gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to succeed in a rapidly changing society. The context of special education and the provision of special education programs and services for exceptional students in Ontario are constantly evolving. Provisions included in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Ontario Human Rights Code have driven some of these changes. Others have resulted from the evolution and sharing of best practices related to the teaching and assessment of students with special educational needs. Accommodations (instructional, environmental or assessment) allow the student with special education needs access to the curriculum without changes to the course curriculum expectations.

Environmental education teaches students about how the planet's physical and biological systems work, and how we can create a more sustainable future. Good curriculum design following the resource document. This ensures that the student will have opportunities to acquire the knowledge, skills, perspectives and practices needed to become an environmentally literate citizen. The online course should provide opportunities for each student to address environmental issues in their home, in their local community, or even at the global level.

USCA helps students to become environmentally responsible. The first goal is to promote learning about environmental issues and solutions. The second goal is to engage students in practicing and promoting environmental stewardship in their community. The third goal stresses the importance of the education system providing leadership by implementing and promoting responsible environmental practices so that all stakeholders become dedicated to living more sustainably. Environmental education teaches students about how the planet's physical and biological systems work, and how we can create a more sustainable future.

USCA provides a number of strategies to address the needs of ESL/ELD students to accommodate the needs of students who require instruction in English as a second language or English literacy development. Our teacher considers it to be his or her responsibility to help students develop their ability to use the English language properly. Appropriate accommodations affecting the teaching, learning, and evaluation strategies in this course may be made in order to help students gain proficiency in English, since students taking English as a second language at the secondary level have limited time in which to develop this proficiency. School determines the student's level of proficiency in the English Language upon registration. This information is communicated to the teacher of the course following the registration and the teacher then invokes a number of strategies and resources to support the student in the course.

Throughout their secondary school education, students will learn about the educational and career opportunities that are available to them; explore and evaluate a variety of those opportunities; relate what they learn in their courses to potential careers in a variety of fields; and learn to make appropriate educational and career choices. The skills, knowledge and creativity that students acquire through this course are essential for a wide range of careers. Being able to express oneself in a clear concise manner without ambiguity in a second language, would be an overall intention of this course, as it helps students prepare for success in their working lives.

By applying the skills they have developed, students will readily connect their classroom learning to real-life activities in the world in which they live.

Cooperative education and other workplace experiences will broaden their knowledge of employment opportunities in a wide range of fields. In addition, students will increase their understanding of workplace practices and the nature of the employer-employee relationship. Teachers should maintain links with community-based businesses to ensure that students have access to hands-on experiences that will reinforce the knowledge they have gained in school.

Every student is entitled to learn in a safe, caring environment, free from violence and harassment. Students learn and achieve better in such environments. The safe and supportive social environment at USCA is founded on healthy relationships between all people. Healthy relationships are based on respect, caring, empathy, trust, and dignity, and thrive in an environment in which diversity is honoured and accepted. Healthy relationships do not tolerate abusive, controlling, violent, bullying/harassing, or other inappropriate behaviours. To experience themselves as valued and connected members of an inclusive social environment, students need to be involved in healthy relationships with their peers, teachers, and other members.

Critical thinking is the process of thinking about ideas or situations in order to understand them fully, identify their implications, make a judgement, and/or guide decision making. Critical thinking includes skills such as questioning, predicting, analysing, synthesizing, examining opinions, identifying values and issues, detecting bias, and distinguishing between alternatives. Students who are taught these skills become critical thinkers who can move beyond superficial conclusions to a deeper understanding of the issues they are examining. They are able to engage in an inquiry process in which they explore complex and multifaceted issues, and questions for which there may be no clear-cut answers.

The school library program in USCA can help build and transform students' knowledge in order to support lifelong learning in our information- and knowledge-based society. The school library program of these schools supports student success across the curriculum by encouraging students to read widely, teaching them to examine and read many forms of text for understanding and enjoyment, and helping them improve their research skills and effectively use information gathered through research. USCA teachers assist students in accessing a variety of online resources and collections (e.g., professional articles, image galleries, videos, databases). Teachers at USCA will also guide students through the concept of ownership of work and the importance of copyright in all forms of media.

Information literacy is the ability to access, select, gather, critically evaluate, and create information. Communication literacy refers to the ability to communicate information and to use the information obtained to solve problems and make decisions. Information and communications technologies are utilized by all Virtual High School students when the situation is appropriate within their online course. As a result, students will develop transferable skills through their experience with word processing, internet research, presentation software, and telecommunication tools, as would be expected in any other course or any business environment. Although the Internet is a powerful learning tool, there are potential risks attached to its use. All students must be made aware of issues related to Internet privacy, safety, and responsible use, as well as of the potential for abuse of this technology, particularly when it is used to promote hatred.

USCA provides varied opportunities for students to learn about ethical issues and to explore the role of ethics in both public and personal decision making. During the inquiry process, students may need to make ethical judgements when evaluating evidence and positions on various issues, and when drawing their own conclusions about issues, developments, and events. Teachers may need to help students in determining appropriate factors to consider when making such judgements. In addition, it is crucial that USCA teachers provide support and supervision to students throughout the inquiry process, ensuring that students engaged in an inquiry are aware of potential ethical concerns and address them in acceptable ways. Teachers will ensure that they thoroughly address the issue of plagiarism with students. In a digital world in which there is easy access to abundant information, it is very easy to copy the words of others and present them as one's own. Students need to be reminded, even at the secondary level, of the ethical issues surrounding plagiarism, and the consequences of plagiarism should be clearly discussed before students engage in an inquiry. It is important to discuss not only dishonest plagiarism but also more negligent plagiarism instances.

Assessment FOR Learning Assessment AS Learning Assessment OF Learning

During this process the teacher seeks information from the students in order to decide where the learners are and where they need to go.

During this process the teacher fosters the capacity of the students and establishes individual goals for success with each one of them.

During this process the teacher reports student’s results in accordance to established criteria to inform how well students are learning.

Conversation Conversation Conversation

Classroom discussion Self-evaluation Peer assessment

Classroom discussion Small group discussion Post-lab conferences Presentations of research Debates
Observation Observation Observation
Drama workshops (taking direction) Steps in problem solving Group discussions Presentations Group Presentations
Student Products Student Products Student Products
Reflection journals (to be kept throughout the duration of the course)
Check Lists
Success Criteria
Practice sheets
Socrative quizzes
Projects
Poster presentations Tests
In Class Presentations

Some of the approaches to teaching/learning include

 

Strategy

Who

Assessment Tool

Assignments

teacher

rubric or marking scheme

Oral Presentations

self/peer or teacher

rubric

Work & Task Sheets

self /peer or teacher

checklist or rubric or marking scheme

Textbook Use

self or teacher

checklist

Teacher Led Review

self/peer or teacher

checklist

Performance Task

self/peer or teacher

rubric

Written Quiz

teacher

marking scheme

Written Test

teacher

marking scheme

Performance Task

teacher

rubric or marking scheme

Final Written Exam

teacher

marking scheme